Angela Moore, CFP® Modern Money Advisor

Contact this advisor

About Angela Moore, MSPFP, CFP®, MPAS®, CRPC®, CFEI

Financial Advisor. Speaker. Financial Literacy Activist. Commentator. Coach. Philanthropist.
Angela M. Moore, MSPFP, CFP®, MPAS®, CRPC®, CFEI, a passionate, outspoken financial literacy activist, is quickly becoming one of the most prominent financial figures, planners, motivational speakers, television host and commentator of our time.

Her platform to meet people where they are in their lifestyle, equip them with financial literacy education and to fundamentally change the way individuals and families incorporate financial planning into their lives propels her daily. She promotes financial literacy as a lifestyle as opposed to a tool to consider in specific life stages.

As the founder of Modern Money Advisor, LLC, a private financial planning, education and media company that provides personal and business financial education to people and media outlets through boot-camps, books, seminars and educational products all over the world, Moore has built her brand catering to many that have previously gone ignored.

The core of Moore’s business is financial planning. Her approach to financial planning is all about taking the time to get to know each and every one of her clients. Her personalized approach prioritizes client’s financial objectives, lifestyle values and retirement goals.

Moore challenges everyone to incorporate financial responsibility into his or her daily lifestyle and choices. Through self-promotion and entrepreneurship, Moore has developed a turnkey brand that caters to the diversity of the masses. Her multicultural, multigenerational and down to earth appeal has made her an innovative breath of fresh air in this arena.

Angela Moore regularly presents seminars and delivers keynote addresses to schools, non-profit organizations, and the world’s leading corporations, universities, and national conferences dedicated to revolutionizing the way people embrace financial matters.

Prior to starting Modern Money Advisor, Moore worked with high net worth clients across the United States and dedicated her time and energy to providing consultative support that delivers clear and concise information, while identifying clients’ breadth of financial objectives, lifestyle values and retirement goals. Whereas, her target audience has expanded, her mission remains the same.

Moore is equally passionate about service and community involvement. She has spoken at various professional associations, including the National Medical Association, Georgia Association of Black Women Attorneys (GABWA), FICPA, Social Esquire, Bossed Up Boot-camp and more. She was also an instructor at the Teen Financial Academy at Word of Faith mega church, where she was also a presenting speaker at their International Economic Empowerment Conference. Additionally, Angela has lead investment classes at institutions including Divine Savior Academy, Humana, Lotus House, Honey Shine, the Arthur Langford, Jr. Team Leadership Institute and Spelman College.

Let’s make a plan – sign up for a free consultation here.

 

Contact this advisor

Recently Published

Student Loan Series: How To Pay Off Student Debt Faster

July 10, 2020

Student loans are a massive undertaking. With tens of thousands of dollars in debt, student loans can follow you for decades. You might be thinking, is there a way to pay off student loans faster?

We are here to tell you that there is. With the right planning and debt management before, during, and after school you can get rid of your student loans and start moving forward with your financial goals.

Plan early

The key to minimizing student debt is to create a strong plan. Before you can implement any repayment strategies, you’ll need to know exactly how much debt you have. Ask yourself the following questions. 

  • How much do you owe? This includes both principal and interest.

  • What type of loans do you have and should you consider refinancing?

  • What is your income?

  • Do you qualify for income-based repayment plans?

Knowing where you are will give you a better sense of your options moving forward.

Two debt repayment strategies

While there are many ways to go about repaying your student debt, below are two methods you will likely encounter:

  1. Debt avalanche

  2. Debt snowball

Let’s take a closer look at what these strategies are and how they work. With a debt avalanche strategy, you’ll target the loan with the highest interest rate first. The idea is that by eliminating your highest-interest debt, you’ll be able to save more money in the long-term. But this strategy takes more time and means allocating more resources to one loan while maintaining minimum payments required on your other loans.

A debt snowball takes the opposite approach. This strategy encourages you to tackle your smallest debt first. Eliminating a loan, even a small one, can boost motivation and show tangible progress on your debt repayment plan. 

Which strategy is right for you? It all depends on the type of loan you have, your interest rate, income, and other financial goals. A financial advisor will be able to help you look at your unique situation to figure out which method makes the most sense. 

Craft a repayment plan

Once you have a strategy that will work for you, here are a few additional ways to pay off your debt faster. 

Allocate extra income to debt repayment. Did you get a bonus check at work or earn extra commissions this quarter? Consider putting that money toward your student loans. Be sure that your added payments go toward the principal. That way it will lower the amount you have to pay over the life of the loan. 

Use any remaining 529 funds. The SECURE Act made it possible to use up to $10,000 from a 529 plan for student loan repayment. This is penalty-free money which could make a significant dent in your debt. 

Take advantage of tax planning. Did you know that you can write off student loan interest? You can currently deduct up to $2,550 of interest on qualifying loans. This deduction does come with income limits. To take advantage of the full deduction, the adjusted gross income (AGI) for single filers is $65,000 and $135,000 for couples filing jointly. If your AGI exceeds these limits, you could be eligible for a partial deduction or not be eligible at all. You can find more income information here.  

Lower your taxable income. If you are in an income-based repayment plan, lowering your taxable income is directly correlated to your monthly student loan payments. There are a number of ways to do this like increasing your pre-tax retirement contributions (401k, traditional IRA), opening a health savings account, structuring your itemized deductions, planning your self-employment income and corresponding deductions, and making use of relevant tax credits. 

Student loans are a complex topic, one that requires a professional who knows you, your goals, and your financial situation. Our team would love to help you make a plan for paying off your student debt. Book a call today to learn more or sign up for a one-on-one Student Loan Analysis.

The information on this site is provided “AS IS” and without warranties of any kind either express or implied. To the fullest extent permissible pursuant to applicable laws, Modern Money Advisor LLC (referred to as “MMA”) disclaims all warranties, express or implied, including, but not limited to, implied warranties of merchantability, non-infringement and suitability for a particular purpose. MMA does not warrant that the information will be free from error. None of the information provided on this website is intended as investment, tax, accounting or legal advice, as an offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or as an endorsement of any company, security, fund, or other securities or non-securities offering. The information should not be relied upon for purposes of transacting securities or other investments. Your use of the information is at your sole risk. Under no circumstances shall MMA be liable for any direct, indirect, special or consequential damages that result from the use of, or the inability to use, the materials in this site, even if MMA or a MMA authorized representative has been advised of the possibility of such damages. In no event shall MMA have any liability to you for damages, losses and causes of action for accessing this site. Information on this website should not be considered a solicitation to buy, an offer to sell, or a recommendation of any security in any jurisdiction where such offer, solicitation, or recommendation would be unlawful or unauthorized.

Read the full post →

Student Loan Series: Student Loan Forgiveness Options

July 3, 2020

Student loan forgiveness may sound like a fairy godmother swooping in and saving the day, but her magic wand comes with layers of government red tape and rules to wade through before your loan balance hits $0. 

Today, we want to walk you through the basics of a few loan forgiveness programs that provide student debt relief. Let’s get started.

Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF)

PSLF was designed to help employees in public service repay their loans. Here’s how you can qualify for this program:

  • Full-time employment for U.S federal, state, local, or tribal government or non-profit.

  • Have Federal Direct loans

  • Payments made through a qualified income-driven repayment plan (remember those?). 

  • Make 120 qualifying payments

After 10 years (assuming you make the qualifying payments consecutively), your loan balance will be forgiven. This system can be complex and depending on your provider, the information could get lost in the shuffle. We recommend keeping all records and paperwork documenting the employee certification form, your repayment plan, and each of your qualified payments. Unlike other forgiveness programs, your remaining loan balance is not considered ordinary income, therefore it is not subject to taxation (sigh of relief). 

Teacher Loan Forgiveness

Financial planning for teachers is especially important, and student loans are a big part of that equation. The Teacher Loan Forgiveness program is best for those who don’t have as much student debt because the program is less extensive than PSLF. In order to qualify you need to, 

  • Teach full-time at a qualified low-income elementary or secondary school

  • Maintain full-time status for 5 consecutive years

  • Have federal direct or Stafford loans

After 5 years up to $17,500 can be forgiven. That amount depends on the subjects and grade level you teach for example secondary math, science, and special education teachers are eligible for the full $17,500, whereas teaching any other subject only allows up to $5,000 to be forgiven. 

Income-Driven Repayment Forgiveness

For those enrolled in one of the 4 income-driven repayment programs we wrote about in the prior email, after the repayment period has ended the remainder of your loan balance is forgiven. Keep in mind that leftover balance can be taxed as ordinary income. So if you have $30,000 forgiven, you could be responsible for thousands of dollars of ordinary income tax, depending on your tax bracket.

Other options

Depending on your profession and where you live, there could be numerous other student debt relief efforts. For example, some states have state-sponsored repayment assistance programs. 

Most military personnel are also eligible for loan forgiveness depending on the program. Check with your branch to see if you qualify. 

Another option to look for is student loan assistance in your employee benefits package. Many new employers offer limited assistance in repaying student loans for new employees, so check into this at your company. 

Having a strong plan to repay student loans will enhance your financial health. Finding the right assistance for you will take time but with the help of a professional, you will know you are working toward the right plan. Ready to learn more about which forgiveness programs you qualify for? Our team would love to help you evaluate your options. Book a call today to learn more or sign up for a one-on-one Student Loan Analysis.

The information on this site is provided “AS IS” and without warranties of any kind either express or implied. To the fullest extent permissible pursuant to applicable laws, Modern Money Advisor LLC (referred to as “MMA”) disclaims all warranties, express or implied, including, but not limited to, implied warranties of merchantability, non-infringement and suitability for a particular purpose. MMA does not warrant that the information will be free from error. None of the information provided on this website is intended as investment, tax, accounting or legal advice, as an offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or as an endorsement of any company, security, fund, or other securities or non-securities offering. The information should not be relied upon for purposes of transacting securities or other investments. Your use of the information is at your sole risk. Under no circumstances shall MMA be liable for any direct, indirect, special or consequential damages that result from the use of, or the inability to use, the materials in this site, even if MMA or a MMA authorized representative has been advised of the possibility of such damages. In no event shall MMA have any liability to you for damages, losses and causes of action for accessing this site. Information on this website should not be considered a solicitation to buy, an offer to sell, or a recommendation of any security in any jurisdiction where such offer, solicitation, or recommendation would be unlawful or unauthorized.

Read the full post →

Student Loan Series: What are my Income-Driven Repayment Plan Options?

June 26, 2020

Not all student loan payments are created equal. While standard repayment terms consist of 120 consecutive payments over 10 years, there are a number of different options for people to repay their debt with a much smaller monthly payment. 

Federal loan borrowers are able to take advantage of income-driven repayment options, which cap monthly payments as percentages of your income and extend the period of repayment to 20 or even 25 years. There are four options to consider:

  • Pay As You Earn (PAYE)

  • Revised Pay As You Earn (REPAYE)

  • Income-Based Repayment (IBR)

  • Income-Contingent Repayment (ICR)

Let’s see how each of these work and which might be right for you.

Pay As You Earn

PAYE caps your student loan payment to 10% of your discretionary income but it never exceeds the amount you would have paid in a standard 10-year repayment plan. This makes PAYE a good option for those consistently making a lower salary. 

The repayment term is 20 years, after which time the remainder of the loan is forgiven. 

With PAYE, the interest added to your monthly payment is limited to 10% of the loan. So if your loan was $50,000 and it accrued $10,000 in interest. Only 10%, or $5,000, would be added to your bill. This repayment plan also allows you to base payments on your tax filing status, which benefits married couples who choose to file their taxes separately.

Revised Pay As You Earn

Similar to PAYE, this payment plan caps payments at 10% of discretionary income. For undergraduate debt, the repayment term is 20 years and extends to 25 for graduate debt. 

REPAYE has a generous interest subsidy which allows a portion of your interest to be forgiven. This is a huge benefit, as monthly payments are generally low, extending the amount of interest accrued over the life of the loan. This plan is best for people who are single, as if you are married REPAYE will count your spouse’s income when determining monthly payments, regardless of whether you file your taxes separately or jointly. 

Income-Based Repayment

For borrowers after July 1, 2014, your monthly payments are capped at 10% of your income with a 20-year repayment period. But if you borrowed before that date, the cap increases to 15% of your income and the life of repayment extends to 25 years. 

Similar to PAYE, your monthly payments are based on your tax filing status. Under the new rules, your monthly payments never exceed what your payments would have been in a standard plan, but if your income increases you may no longer qualify for IBR and face added interest burdens.

Income-Contingent Repayment

ICR has the most expensive monthly payments of all the other income-driven repayment options. Under this plan, your monthly payments are capped at 20% of your income over 25 years. While more costly, this is the only income-driven plan that those with parent PLUS loans qualify for. 

Benefits to consider

An income-driven repayment plan is an excellent way to keep your monthly student loan payments at bay while still working toward other financial goals. These plans make it possible to pay the rest of your bills and carry the option for loan forgiveness at the end of the repayment period. 

Drawbacks to consider

While helpful in debt management, these income-driven repayment plans have a few key drawbacks including inflated interest payments. With smaller monthly payments, you may end up paying much more in interest over the life of the loan. 

While the remainder of your loan can be forgiven after the repayment period ends, you could be on the hook for taxes on the forgiven amount. Be sure to look into this before you receive an unpleasant surprise come tax time.  In the next email, we’ll give more information about the various repayment options.

Our team is here to help you analyze your options and create a debt reduction strategy that works for you. Book a call today to learn more or sign up for a one-on-one Student Loan Analysis.

The information on this site is provided “AS IS” and without warranties of any kind either express or implied. To the fullest extent permissible pursuant to applicable laws, Modern Money Advisor LLC (referred to as “MMA”) disclaims all warranties, express or implied, including, but not limited to, implied warranties of merchantability, non-infringement and suitability for a particular purpose. MMA does not warrant that the information will be free from error. None of the information provided on this website is intended as investment, tax, accounting or legal advice, as an offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or as an endorsement of any company, security, fund, or other securities or non-securities offering. The information should not be relied upon for purposes of transacting securities or other investments. Your use of the information is at your sole risk. Under no circumstances shall MMA be liable for any direct, indirect, special or consequential damages that result from the use of, or the inability to use, the materials in this site, even if MMA or a MMA authorized representative has been advised of the possibility of such damages. In no event shall MMA have any liability to you for damages, losses and causes of action for accessing this site. Information on this website should not be considered a solicitation to buy, an offer to sell, or a recommendation of any security in any jurisdiction where such offer, solicitation, or recommendation would be unlawful or unauthorized.

Read the full post →

Visit the blog →

Ideal Clients

  • African Americans
  • Debt Management
  • Gen Y/Millennials
  • Women's Finance

Ways Advisor Charges

  • Monthly Fee

Fee Options

  • Monthly Fee: $200+
  • AUM: 1.25%

Also do workshops and online financial classes

SEC Records

States Registered

  • Florida

Loading...